Category Access to Treatment

What You Know Affects Treatment

 

Susan Weinstein, JD
Editor in Chief, Care for Your Mind

It’s hard to make good decisions when you don’t have good information. And in a system where healthcare providers have less and less time to provide the information necessary for good decision making, it falls to individuals and their supportive family members and friends to be proactive in getting the information they need for making informed healthcare decisions.

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Depression Treatment: It’s About You

One thing is sure about depression treatment: it’s not one-size-fits-all. And it never should be.

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When Primary Care Providers Treat Depression: Tips for Engagement

Susan Weinstein, JD
Editor in Chief, Care for Your Mind

Primary Care Providers (PCPs) are usually the first clinicians to treat a person’s depression. Family caregivers can enhance treatment outcomes by providing information to the clinician and support to the person living with depression. Families for Depression Awareness’ new video provides tips for working effectively with PCPs for the benefit of your loved one and your family.

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Retail Shopping: Groceries, Electronics, Toys… and Therapy?

Susan Weinstein, JD
Editor in Chief, Care for Your Mind

As you head out to pick up some items from the big retail store near you, your shopping list might include toothpaste, light bulbs, milk, and diapers. Can you imagine a therapy appointment being one of the items?

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The Downside of Mental Health Awareness

Susan Weinstein

Susan Weinstein, J.D.
Editor-in-Chief, Care for Your Mind

Taraji P. Henson recently joined the ranks of celebrities
openly discussing their experiences of living with mental health conditions. In
starting her own nonprofit organization, the star of the movie “Hidden Figures”
and the television show “Empire” aims to break down the stigma around mental
health among African Americans and to encourage people to seek help without
shame. Ms. Henson has created an opportunity to reach millions of people who
might not otherwise receive these messages.


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Is “No Known Mental Health Condition” Useful for Suicide Prevention?

CDC VitalSigns June 2018

Care for Your Mind

Fifty-four percent of people who died by suicide did not have a known mental health condition.

That’s a key message from the June 2018 issue of “Vital Signs,” published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (download). What should we interpret this number to mean?

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My Approach to Cultural Competence in Mental Health Care

Derek J. Wilson

Derek J. Wilson, Ph.D.
Prairie View A&M University

“I’m not crazy” is probably the most common phrase I’ve heard from members of the Black community when the issue of mental health care is raised. “Crazy” is shameful, a reason to be ostracized.

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How CLAS Matters for Minority Mental Health

Victoria Huynh

Victoria Huynh
Center for Pan Asian Community Services

As a person who works in the limited English proficient, immigrant, and refugee communities, CLAS is a matter of whether someone will gain access to essential health services or not.

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