How to Help a Loved One with a Mood Disorder: The FFDA Action Plan

Valerie D. Cordero, Ph.D.
Co-Executive Director, Families for Depression Awareness

Many of us spend time with families over the holidays, giving us a chance to catch up and check in. When a loved one with depression or bipolar disorder declines to join in the celebration, is behaving uncharacteristically, or is facing a challenging situation, it may rightfully raise concerns among the rest of the family. If you want to work together to help your loved one, we have a strategy to offer: the Family Action Plan.

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Does Your Family Know Your Mental Health Care Preferences?

Susan Weinstein
Editor in Chief, Care for Your Mind

Continuing our important conversations about mental health for your family this holiday season, let’s talk about psychiatric advance directives, or PADs. Wouldn’t it be great if you were able to provide instructions for your family in the event your mood disorder renders you unable to advocate for yourself? Here’s the good news: you can!

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Retail Shopping: Groceries, Electronics, Toys… and Therapy?

Susan Weinstein, JD
Editor in Chief, Care for Your Mind

As you head out to pick up some items from the big retail store near you, your shopping list might include toothpaste, light bulbs, milk, and diapers. Can you imagine a therapy appointment being one of the items?

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This Holiday Season, Talk About Mental Health in Your Family

Susan Weinstein, JD
Editor in Chief, Care for Your Mind

We have an assignment for you: when your family is gathered to celebrate any of the upcoming holidays, have a conversation about your  health history. There’s no better time than now to learn about your family’s health history, including mental health issues.

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How We Can Support Veterans in Need of Mental Health Help

Care for Your Mind acknowledges and appreciates the collaboration of the National Network of Depression Centers in developing this series.

Sanjai Rao, M.D., VA Medical Center, San Diego

In my previous post, I addressed the challenging state of mental health care for our nation’s returning veterans and their increased risk of suicide. It’s crucial that we step up and ensure that mental health care is available to all former servicemen and women who need it. Now, I propose some possible solutions.


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Shared Decision Making – with Families – Yields Better Treatment Outcomes

Alison M. Heru, M.D.
Professor of Psychiatry, University
of Colorado Denver

In the NES
Program at University of Colorado Health, a six-month program
combining neurology and psychiatry treatment for non-epileptic or
non-electrical seizures, psychiatrist Dr. Alison Heru makes shared
decision making an integral part of practice.


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How Can Parents Help in Shared Decision Making?

Mother and daughter with doctor

Families for Depression Awareness for Care for Your Mind

Your teenager has
been diagnosed with a mood disorder and the clinician is talking with
her or him about treatment. What is your role as a parent in the
shared decision making model? How can you participate?


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Why You Deserve Shared Decision Making

John W. Williams Jr., MD
Professor of Medicine and Psychiatry, Duke University

As a patient, would you want your physician making healthcare decisions on your behalf without any regard for your personal preferences, values, or needs? If you’re like most people, you’d prefer to be involved in choosing the care that’s right for you. After all, it’s your body, your mind, your financial resources, and your life.


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