Depression Treatment: Finding Affordable Therapy

Kimberly Morrow, LCSW

Editor’s Note: Over the course of the past several posts on depression treatment, we’ve focused on matching the treatment to the person. For most people with moderate to severe depression, medication is an element of treatment. Thus, the series includes discussion about making choices among medications to best align with the person living with depression’s goals, preferences, and priorities. We also acknowledge that talk therapy is often a core component of effective treatment and long-lasting wellness. In this archived post, we share strategies to access therapy services when cost is an issue.

Read More

Using Decision Aids in Depression Treatment: An Update

The quality of the decision making process has significant consequences with regard to treatment experience and treatment outcomes. What is happening in the field of development and use of decision aids?

Read More

Depression Treatment in Primary Care: Tips for Caregivers

Care for Your Mind

For most people, Primary Care Providers are their most accessible health care professionals. PCPs (for example, general medicine or family physician, nurse practitioner) are the first line of care for a host of physical conditions and are frequently the first to diagnose and treat depression. Because PCPs are busy and not always attuned to mental health issues – especially as mental health disorders are often masked by physical complaints and discussion of concerns is stymied by stigma – it’s important for caregivers of people living with mood disorders to be educated about depression and prepared to advocate for the treatment that best fits their loved ones’ goals, preferences, and priorities.

Read More

Ways to Facilitate Depression Treatment

Dr. Anita Clayton on depression treatment on Care for Your Mind

Anita H. Clayton, M.D.
Chair, Department of Psychiatry & Neurobehavioral Sciences
University of Virginia School of Medicine

The mental health care system is overburdened, so it’s a comfort to know that primary care providers are generally capable of starting a person’s depression treatment. In fact, about two-thirds of antidepressant prescriptions are written by primary care providers. If you’ve read the past several posts here on Care for Your Mind (see the list in resources below), you’ll know to communicate with your health care provider to decide on the treatment that is the best fit for you. In this post, Dr. Anita Clayton provides you with strategies and helps you set reasonable expectations for treatment.

Read More

Faster and Easier Approaches for Improving Patients’ Depression Treatment Outcomes

Michael E. Thase, M.D.

Michael E. Thase, M.D.
Professor of Psychiatry
Director, Mood and Anxiety Disorders Treatment and Research Program
University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine

Depression affects more than 15 million Americans and it’s the leading underlying factor for people who attempt suicide. Only half of Americans diagnosed with major depression receive treatment. Because earlier diagnosis and treatment improve outcomes, mental health screenings should be a top priority.

Read More

How to Address Other Issues in Depression Treatment

Dr. Anita Clayton on depression treatment on Care for Your Mind

Anita H. Clayton, M.D.
Chair, Department of Psychiatry & Neurobehavioral Sciences
University of Virginia School of Medicine

For many of us, depression treatment isn’t straightforward, as we encounter medical, practical, cultural, and other issues. This shouldn’t be seen as reason for despair, but – with flexibility, creativity, compassion, and an open mind – an opportunity to create the right treatment plan for each individual.

Read More

How to Get the Best, Most Appropriate, Tailored-for-You Depression Treatment

Dr. Anita Clayton on depression treatment on Care for Your Mind

Anita H. Clayton, M.D.
Chair, Department of Psychiatry & Neurobehavioral Sciences
University of Virginia School of Medicine

Depression can negatively impact all aspects of a person’s life, from interpersonal relationships at home and in social circles to productivity at work. Untreated depression can last for a year or longer. There are effective treatments, but for any treatment plan to be successful, it has to be followed. You can learn to advocate for your (or your loved one’s) care to find the personalized treatment plan that aligns with your goals, preferences, and priorities and boosts your likelihood of sticking with it.

Read More

Response, Remission, Recovery: What Are Your Depression Treatment Goals?

Response, Remission, Recovery Are Depression Treatment Goals

What is the goal of depression treatment? At a minimum, treatment should alleviate symptoms. Increasingly, however, people living with depression, their families, and their providers should expect more, that optimal care should result in both abatement of symptoms and recovery of function. That is to say, people with depression should be able to live their lives in a way that is symptom-free and allows them to participate in their chosen life activities and relationships.

Read More